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Becoming self-employed
When you become self-employed it means you are carrying on your own business rather than working for an employer and there are a number of things to take into consideration. Working for yourself can have a number of advantages and disadvantages. For example, it means you are in control of what you do, so you can organise your own hours. On the other hand, it can involve working very hard and you may no longer have a regular income.

When you start a business you can do so either as a sole trader, partnership or limited company. The type of structure you choose depends on the kind of business you are carrying on, with whom you will be doing business and your attitude to risk. Here we look at setting up as a sole trader. That is, when you set up a business on your own. Being a sole trader is relatively straightforward to set up, but if your business fails, all your assets could be used to pay your creditors.

Much of the process of preparing for self-employment is about starting a business. This is the same information whether you are a sole trader or a partnership or company. The guide to self employment Toil and Trouble (pdf) is available on the Department of Social Protection website. City and County Enterprise Boards and local development companies provide supports such as advice to local businesses that are starting up or developing - see 'Where to apply' below.

Courtesty of Citizens Information Board

    Becoming self-employed
    Tax registration
    Insurance
    Getting credit
    Advice & support
    Useful links


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